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GrandAdmiralThrawn
Member

Heaven forbid

GrandAdmiralThrawn
Member

Maybe because it is ineffective, as people who show no symptoms are going to test negative even if they are carriers?

Just like you get the flu, test negative, and then test positive a few days later.

Or you get pregnant, test negative, and then test positive after a few more weeks of baby growing.

Or you test negative for a heart attack, but they keep you for 6 hours or so and run the blood work again to see if the first test was wrong because you didn’t have enough heart death for it to show up.

tiki god
Admin

that’s not how either of those work, at all.

GrandAdmiralThrawn
Member

Same symptoms as the flu. Same treatment. Supportive care.

A flu test is equally stupid.

camelrider
Member

South Korea would like a word.

GrandAdmiralThrawn
Member

Prayer, or the collective effort of Karma, whichever, has been shown to have a net positive effect.

Not to mention the fact that the biggest threat of this virus is people. Because people are dumb, panicky dangerous animals.

tiki god
Admin

that’s called the placebo effect

GrandAdmiralThrawn
Member

Peer reviewed medical journals say otherwise.

Gropegrope
Member

You’re quoting two isolated studies that were barely outside the error bars.
There are about 2 dozen more that conclusively show paryer doesn’t work….but right wing sites seem blind to theses.

GrandAdmiralThrawn
Member

No. I get my medical information from medical journals. With a health dose of skepticism for any study involving a drug that comes from big pharma.

Don’t think I’ve ever seen medical information on a right wing site. Or any information really. I really don’t go to those.

GrandAdmiralThrawn
Member

And for the record. I was not quoting any studies in my previous posts. It is well known inside the medical community. It is both proven and accepted. Not just in America.

tiki god
Admin

pretty sure those studies literally said it’s a placebo effect. which to be clear: it’s an actual thing that has an effect on people, but only because they think it will.

GrandAdmiralThrawn
Member

The literature suggests that prayer is recognised as a complementary intervention or alternative therapy identified by healthcare professionals as adequate treatment for religious/spiritual disturbances or concerns, because patients considered it significant when it was used [39]. In a holistic paradigm and patient centered care all patients’ dimensions should be considered and all needs should be addressed, and this is often included in professional ethical codes and main health policies. Even when physicians or nurses (as those that are more in contact with the patients) feel they are unprepared to pray with patients, the presence of religious leaders or chaplains should… Read more »

GrandAdmiralThrawn
Member

www.mja.com.au/journal/2007/186/10/prayer-medicine-how-much-have-we-learned

Many people use prayer, and some studies have shown a positive association between prayer and improved health outcomes. This article explores four possible mechanisms by which prayer may lead to improved health.
While acknowledging the efficacy of prayer and recognising the needs of patients, prayer, being a personal spiritual practice, cannot be prescribed, nor should it be used in place of medical care.