Space pod

escapepod.jpg (702 KB)


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    Gropegrope

    Cool.
    But why build it for gravity….?

    tes

    Using the “command panel” with your arms up like that would get painful pretty fast in gravity.

    Gropegrope

    Manly’s angry and busy again…..
    Good one manly!

    ManlyMan

    I’m living in your head, rent-free.

    OverIyManIyMan

    If you figure in the sheer hours/days/weeks it takes you to change accounts, fuck with the votes & ratings and behave like a squealing twat, it sure looks like you’re the one paying top dollar.

    fink

    You’re just upset someone else is doing it now, to counter your manipulation.

    OverIyManIyMan

    Here’s the punchline: I haven’t manipulated a thing. You’ve been shrieking & pointing your finger at the wrong guy this whole time.

    Grodney

    Here’s the thing. I haven’t been doing anything either. It’s all in you mind. Which is where I live.

    OverIyManIyMan

    In your mind?

    fink

    No, your mind, where I live, rent free.

    OverIyManIyMan

    So YOUR mind.

    HoChunk

    Get a room and bolt the fucking door, already.

    Gropegrope

    Good for you manly!
    Well done!

    JediaKyrol

    wait…the thrusters are directly opposite the door? No concern about micrometeorite impacts disabling your only means of egress?

    tiki god

    not following you, how would micrometeorites prohibit you from leaving?

    JediaKyrol

    impacts on the seam could cause spot-welds, or even bend the door or frame (a grain of sand going at 1/4 light speed packs a whole lot of wallop)…and since the door is right in the nose, that gives a ridiculously high chance of impact compared to putting it pretty much anywhere else. NASA worried about that when designing the space shuttles.

    But then again, there is no airlock…so these things would probably only dock with a specific rig that would have tools to bypass such damage.

    JediaKyrol

    …better analogy…take the old “airplane vs. duck” calculation hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/impulse.html

    and an object with 1mm diameter and weighing 1/10th of a gram traveling at .25c relatively (that means it is moving at 1/8 towards you and your ship is moving 1/8 towards it.) would have an impact force of 6,314,320,893,778.225 Tons.

    The space shuttle orbits the Earth at 28,000 km/h…so a stationary object of the same size hitting it would “only” have an impact force of 176,122 Tons…which is why they have all those ablative layers and Whipple shielding.

    tiki god

    Ah, it’s somewhat ambiguous as to where the door is in relation to the thrusters, I was reading it to say that they were in the same spot, which would have it’s own set of problems of course.

    Also, I’d like to point out that plenty of scifi has both inertial dampeners and deflector dishes, so those things may not even be a problem.

    JediaKyrol

    yeah…didn’t take forcefields into consideration…and this thing obviously has gravity generators because everything is oriented expecting one constant “down” direction.

    By the way, If you haven’t, you should read the Chronicles of the Lensmen…was pretty good hard sci-fi for back in the day. It even went over the slow constant sandblasting of plowing a ship through lightyears of “empty” space. And what would happen if you took a ship going at near light speed, negated its inertia, landed on a planet, then cut the inertia back on…