A short history of Modern African-American Music

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    TrikYodzdieAntagonistaEntropicMusingsMessatsunokamifracked again Recent comment authors
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    KommissarKvC
    Member

    black guys today dont make music, they make organized noise

    jonblaze81
    Member

    The one on top is a well educated musician. He had an understanding of music structure, arrangements, and collaborated with other top flight musicians to create something beauitful.

    The one on the bottom is an illiterate nigger who should be strung up from the nearest tree as a warning to the rest of the “would be” rap artists out there. I use the term artist with a bad taste on my tongue.

    KommissarKvC
    Member

    lets start with Kayne West

    noodles
    Member

    Wow…that’s some ignorant ignorant shit. First and foremost, there are two styles of music that get conflated all the time, Hip hop and Corporate Rap Shit. Corporate Rap Shit is what you hear in the clubs, on the radio, at sporting events. There is no message, there is no musicality, there is no talent. Music industry execs (rich white guys in suits) find something they can brand and market, and exploit it for massive profit. I’m talking about 50 Cent, Lil Wayne, etc Hip hop bubbles up from the underground, with artists like Murs, Aesop Rock, Gift of Gab, Lyrics… Read more »

    dieAntagonista
    Guest

    noodles, yet another point we agree on. Oh and how. Aesop Rock oh yes, Brother Ali, doseone, Saul Williams, Sage Francis, Atmosphere, Sole, etc. The thing is people realise that mainstream Rock, Pop, Electronica is bound to be mostly shit, but when it comes to HipHop they think that’s the big exception where mainstream speaks also for the rest. Anyway you’re awesome. Also don’t bother with Kommissar, he just has a problem with people who aren’t white nationalists, this is not about music to him. I also like what you said about how Jazz used to be looked at in… Read more »

    noodles
    Member

    Damn Ant, if you didn’t live in Europe, I’d ask you to marry me 😉

    I’ve got a particular affinity for Atmosphere, Brother Ali, POS and Heiruspecs since they’re all from the Twin Cities. There is some phenomenal hip hop out there, just under the surface.

    If you read Miles Davis’s autobiography, and then follow it up with Jeffry Chang’s Can’t Stop Won’t Stop, you’ll see that the beginnings of both genre’s of music bear striking resemblances, albeit 60 years apart.

    dieAntagonista
    Guest

    I like how you called me Ant. As in anticon., get it get it. Haha. Nice, ditto my friend. But who is POS? Heiruspecs looks familiar but I’m not sure. I like anyone who has had anything to with the label anticon. I agree on the phenomenal hiphop part. In the most ideal case it is spoken poetry with a beat, I dig poetry and I’m a fan of beats so it’s all peachy. It’s silly to say that hiphop isn’t music just because it is something that’s different from how music used to be. If someone doesn’t like its… Read more »

    TrikYodz
    Member

    just… what you just said was so annyoing and such a pain in the ass to read as if you know exactally how it was back then and how it is now. just stop. youre not an authority on anything and it is obvious that you are an elitest. so just dont bother. you didnt have me convinced and you probabally wont for a long while.

    dieAntagonista
    Guest

    Why can’t he know how it was back then? You don’t know his age nor how many books he has read or what people he talked to. Besides he doesn’t have to know exactly how it was back then. I would say the comparisons he made are pretty good and honest, you come up with something better if you are so certain he’s wrong. I also saw you agreeing with Snow about rap on the forum in the what song-are-you-listening-to-right-now thread. His comment was far more elitist than noodles’ balanced statement could ever be. I actually replied to that comment… Read more »

    TrikYodz
    Member

    Just stop. youre not really getting what im saying. when it comes to music youre the one being elitest. IE ridicling me for liking incubus and Queens of the stoneage, and theyre considered mainstream. but you dont bother to listen to them. sooooo yeah… i just cant take you seriously when it comes to music.
    specally when youre an admitted flyleaf fan. what a joke.
    its nickelback with a girl lead singer.

    Belbo
    Member

    riposte?

    The Matrix: Rebooted
    Member

    Those who don’t learn from history are doomed to repost it.
    www.myconfinedspace.com/2009/07/17/progression-of-black-music/

    gx5000
    Member

    You’re comparing Jazz Idols to Street Hip Hoppers ?
    Who’s ignorant now…

    noodles
    Member

    They weren’t idols then, they were playing in small, cramped, underground clubs. Jazz was widely criticized as not being “real” music, but a sign of the degradation of our society. Sound familiar?

    And the guys I listed above are not “street hip hoppers”, they’re musicians who use the genre of hip hop as their medium.

    jonblaze81
    Member

    The point of my original post is that Coltrane was a musician. I never started anything about corporate music vs. underground stuff. Coltrane played an instrument, collaborated with other artists, and contributed to the world by creating art. Lil’ Wayne on the other hand is not a musician. He does not create art. The act of listening to the shit that spews from his mouth (and others like him) makes you dumber from the experience. Which goes back to my original point. Coltrane was a musician, and his works should be listened to and yes studied by other musicians and… Read more »

    Messatsunokami
    Member

    It’s sad the mainstream acts represent genres. Instead of acts like Jedi Mind tricks, MF Doom, Aesop Rock, Busdriver, and many others, Lil Wayne is the poster child.

    EntropicMusings
    Member

    I was about to throw out JMT , but you took care of them. I’d also like to throw The Coup onto the “let’s name underground hip-hip artists we listen” list. Whether people like it or not, Lil’ Wayne is art. Art is interpretive. You throw out Weezy simply because you don’t like the sound, or the race of its creator, or don’t get it, you might as well tell Picasso, Lennon, and whole slew of artists to eat a fat dick because that’s not music/painting/sculpture/etc. I’m not positing that “lollipop” was intended to be more than moneymaking hip-pop, but… Read more »

    EntropicMusings
    Member

    I’d like to blame Christina Hendricks for the grammatical errors above.

    fracked again
    Member

    WHAT? YEAH!

    Oh, and what noodles and dA said.

    Messatsunokami
    Member

    @Entropic First of all love the screen name. Anyway, yeah I get what you’re saying, but it’s like freestyle poetry. I can write some paragraph and it can be considered a poem. Sounds kinda unfair. Although of course, without crap you can’t tell what actually is good. The problem is that the good stuff is usually buried under piles of crap. To add insult to injury, I’ve turned on the tv to find people that don’t know WTF they talking about naming Lil Wayne the best rapper alive. And then you find people who claim to know hip hop and… Read more »

    EntropicMusings
    Member

    I wasn’t necessarily responding to your comments as much as the thread as a whole, sorry for any confusion. I actually pretty much agree with all of your thoughts. Somewhere in my ramblings i got on an “art is subjective” kick (which I agree can be unfair) when I was actually trying to say that music doesn’t always have to be art. Lords of Acid may make great music to bone to, but I don’t know if I would call it art. And I agree, I hate when music fans aren’t open to learnin’ their history. It’s even worse when… Read more »