walmart – dignity for walmart workers

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    19 Responses to walmart – dignity for walmart workers

    1. Apple produces products in China in a factory that’s more like prison and has a high suicide rate. I don’t see anyone protesting Apple.

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    2. Its just the People to hate for the week, next week it will be K-Mart!

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    3. Dignity for Wal-Mart workers? How – by boycotting the stores so they have to close down and the workers lose their jobs?

      Idiotic. Why can’t the left ‘think’ beyond just making themselves feel good?

      Now if you’ll excuse me, I have to catch my flight on Eastern airlines for my Christmas trip.

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      • It is not about boycotting. It is about raising the quality of work, wages, and life for Walmart employees.

        forrespect.org/our-walmart/about-us/

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        • THEY’RE A PRIVATE COMPANY! What business is it of yours what they make? Somebody, (Mr. Sam) invested cash and sweat to build this gigantic retail empire. But NOOooo — WE know better.

          Such arrogance.

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          • Is there a boundary private comapnies can cross when it comes to work conditions?

            Can they require thier employees to work in hazardous enviroments without saftey equipment?

            Can they refuse employment if the employee refuses to provide sexual favors?

            Can they employ children?

            Can they make demands on the employees’ personal lives outside of work? Can they threaten an employee’s job if the employee does something the company doesn’t approve of?

            Is there a line that a company can cross? That’s basically what I am asking.

            If you see no boundary that private companies can cross, do you have an issue with employees striking or utilizing tactics to negotiate for superior conditions?

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          • Is there a boundary private companies can cross when it comes to work conditions?

            Can they require their employees to work in hazardous environments without safety equipment?

            Can they refuse employment if the employee refuses to provide sexual favors?

            Can they employ children?

            Can they make demands on the employees’ personal lives outside of work? Can they threaten an employee’s job if the employee does something the company doesn’t approve of?

            Is there a line that a company can cross? That’s basically what I am asking.

            If you see no boundary that private companies can cross, do you have an issue with employees striking or utilizing tactics to negotiate for superior conditions?

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            • Let’s see. Aren’t one or two of those things already covered by current law?

              Oh, nope. I’m sorry – ALL of them are. You ever hear of a little place just this side of Nirvana called “The Department of Labor?” Well I have – especially because I used to work very closely with many of their offices. In fact, a good friend of mine has risen to director of the department that oversees child-work regulations.

              As for striking, I’m all with Ronald Reagan, but that was different. Did you see where a Wal-Mart closed because they didn’t want to have to mess with thuggish, lazy unionites. Bet those employees are glad that their jobs went away, right?

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            • You missed the substance of the argument.

              Where is the line that employers are not allowed to cross?

              If those things are allowed, are they ethically ok?

              Also you ignore the question at the end.

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          • @co-mountainmanusanet: The majority of labor laws and rights that are enforced by “The Department of Labor” came into place by unions and collective bargaining movements. If it wasn’t for movements like this one, you would have no workers rights and basically be a slave to the corporations.

            thinkprogress.org/politics/2011/03/05/148930/top-five-things-unions/?mobile=nc

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    4. How about we allow people to have their dignity by getting them off the government payroll. How aout we tell them to stop stealing money from me, my wife and my unborn son?

      Stop sucking my taxes dollar’s because you’re to lazy to work a 2nd job, or a 3rd. To lazy to plant a garden and grow their own food and take responsibility for their actions. To prideful to ask for help and go to a food bank.

      I’ve been enlisted in the Army since I was 17. (Guard). I lived at a fire station as a volunteer trading my services as an Emergency Medical Technician so I could afford to pay for college, and eat. I took the EMT course when I in High school, at 16 in addition to volunteering with an Ambulance Service and with a Fire Company)

      Since I’ve been out of college I’ve worked NOT less then 2 jobs, often three, not counting my military commitment.

      I’ve been fired because my military commitment was to much of a hassle for some employers, and others refused to hire me…(none were stupid enough to say that, sadly).

      I paid for my wife to go through college, and despite being 7 months pregnant, she is still working. People need to not be lazy pieces of shit, and responsible for themselves.

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    5. According to the latest edition of the AFL-CIO’s Executive Pay Watch report, the gap between CEO pay and worker pay expanded last year. In 2011, CEOs in the Fortune 500 made an average of $12 million, about 380 times what the average worker makes: The ratio of CEO-to-worker pay between CEOs of the S&P 500 Index companies and U.S. workers widened to 380 times in 2011 from 343 times in 2010. Back in 1980, the average large company CEO only received 42 times the average worker’s pay.

      This explosion in pay certainly isn’t justified by corporate performance. In fact, “while the average CEO pay increased 13.9 percent at S&P 500 Index companies in 2011, the S&P 500 Index ended the year at the same level as it started.” Just this week, shareholders at Citigroup voted to reject CEO Vikram Pandit’s pay package (in a non-binding vote), saying that he was collecting millions while the company floundered.

      Meanwhile, workers saw their pay increase by just 2.8 percent last year. Already, most of the gains of the nascent economic recovery have been going to the richest Americans (just as they have for recent economic expansions). In 2010, the richest 1 percent captured 93 percent of the nation’s income gains.

      The AFL-CIO is calling for regulators to implement a rule included in the Dodd-Frank financial reform law that requires companies to disclose their CEO-to-worker pay ratio. “Astronomical CEO pay is based on the false idea that the success of a corporation is due to one CEO genius. In reality, all employees create value, and CEO pay levels should be more in line with the rest of their company’s employee pay structure. CEOs should be paid as a member of a team, not as a superstar,” said AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka.

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