Oily Water

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The Big Picture

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    44 Responses to Oily Water

    1. It’s kinda beautiful and hideous at the same time.

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    2. A lot of hyperbole going about this oil spill. People don’t realize that about 2,000 gallons of oil leak naturally into the Gulf everyday NATURALLY. Some news reports are calling this the American Chernobyl; its nowhere near that. I don’t this spill will have any noticeable effect 5 years from now.

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      • Wow, 2,000 gallons is just under 50 barrels. So if we multiply that by, say 10,000 (50,000 barrels/day) everything should just be peachy. Forget that this has already made 19% of the gulf unfishable/unaccessible.

        What fucking right wing talking head did you get that stupid talking point from? You dumb fuck.

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        • Actually Reboot is about as right-wing as karl-marx. And he probably has more degrees in various branches science than jesus christ had disciples. I’m pretty sure he is qualified to do SOME independent thinking on the subject without having to turn on some “right wing talking head’s” program in order to arrive at that conclusion. OR is everyone who thinks that this incident is being exploited and over hyped automatically a right wing loon? Looks like they got you programmed nicely.

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        • and you fail at arithematic: 50 times 10,000 =/= 50,000. So really this is only a factor of about 1,000 times the natural oil leak rate. There are 365 days a year, so this spill is about equivalent to 3 years worth of natural oil leakage. So when I say that in 5 years it won’t make an impact, its because I TOTALLY OWN AT MATH AND SCIENCE.

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          • Follow up: actually leak estimates are about 5,000 barrels/day, so the total leak to date is about 150,000 barrels. So that’s about 10 years worth of natural oil spills. So maybe I should adjust by estimate by a factor of 2. Still, this is no Chernobyl, where its still a hazard 25 years later.

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          • You still comparing gallons to barrels. There is 50,000 to 87,000 barrels spilling a day and it won’t be capped for another 90-100 days BP said today, but they said the Enterprise ship is supposedly going to catch half of that.

            So here’s my calculations

            40 days of spewing 50,000 gallons a day since 4/20= 2 million barrels
            the next 100 days of spewing only half of that due to the ship above= 2.5 million barrels

            2 million + 2.5 million= 4.5 million barrels

            4.5 million barrels to gallons (4,500,000 x 42)= 189,000,000 gallons

            at the end of this that will be the final amount in the ocean

            so we divide that by 2000 to account for the naturally leaking oil to get the number of days =94,500

            divide that by 365 to get the amount of years= 258 years

            did I screw anything up this time?

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            • “There is 50,000 to 87,000 barrels spilling a day”
              “40 days of spewing 50,000 gallons a day since 4/20= 2 million barrels”
              You can’t even keep consistent with your numbers for more than two sentences.
              Look at that math in the 2nd quote: 50,000 gallons*40=2 million GALLONS =47,619 BARRELS
              Is it 50,000 barrels/day or 50,000 gallons/day? Get your own math in order before you talk.
              “did I screw anything up this time?”
              You screwed-up when you started this argument.

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            • Yeah, I meant barrels all the way down til I calculated it into gallons.

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            • Yes, there is natural seepage. It is nothing compared to the ongoing spill in the gulf. Quit being a bitch and admit it. Everybody involved in this discussion has made math mistakes, so quit being self righteous over it.

              Even with the exceedingly cautious estimates that BP is using to calculate the loss, we have already surpassed the Valdez spill, which, despite what you might think, nature has not “taken care of itself” and the environment has still not recovered. In the years to come, many businesses that relied on the already fragile fisheries of the gulf will go under.

              And BP will keep going on, spending more on advertising its green initiatives than it does on its green initiatives.

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            • Beyond seepage, there are few other reasons why I think this is mostly media hype:
              1) there are worse environmental disasters going on right now that get no media coverage. like the Pacific Garbage Patch.
              2) the “commercial and recreational fishing industries” that are being treated as victims are almost as damaging this incident. Everyone makes a big, weepy deal about sea turtles in the oil spill, but they conveniently ignore all the ones caught in shrimp nets.
              3) there have been previous incidents of comparable scale, such as Ixtoc I, and we’ve recovered from those in relatively short time.
              4) the media is quick to point fingers at BP or at regulators, but the real culprit is us, the consumers. As long we demand lifestyles that depend on heavy use of petrochemicals, disasters like this are inevitable. On this very website, there have been entire threads dedicated to making fun of people who bike to work, but a oil spill happens and everyone is up in arms about how terrible it is. Every SUV owners should have their faces rubbed in this oil spill, like a dog that’s shit on the carpet: THIS IS YOUR FAULT.

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            • Your information is fairly off. The Pacific garbage patch is the one full of hype. There are no islands of plastic, just areas with an increased content of small bits of plastic. Photos of the patch have been misidentified and become part of an urban legend.

              Ixtoc was potentially horrific, but much of the oil sank to mix with the benthic sediment. The portion of the Alaskan coast affected by the Valdez has not recovered, and it will be a while before we can draw a verdict. The fishing industry is harmful, but that does not excuse BP. A fishery that feeds and employs people a few more years before collapse is better than one that is gone now or has its life cut even shorter. I’d rather see a chance to manage a resource than see it eliminated.

              The media have been fast to point fingers, and good on them! Yes, we consumers are real rat bastards (I bike and freely admit that most cyclists in my area are douchebags that don’t know the rules of the road), but BP did skirt safety precautions, did lobby to limit regulations and oversight, did not build a safe well or maintain a safe drill site, left a failed failsafe in place and did not add a second failsafe because of an expense that was inconsequential to their operating costs. Their failure to do the right thing made this kind of accident an inevitability, not the consumer’s need for petrol.

              Do consumers bear some responsibility? Yes, but are they liable? No, and that is an important difference that you are missing.

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      • George Carlin sums this whole environmental panic shit up properly

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      • I think that will depend on how it’s handled. There’s a huge difference between 2,000gpd and ~250,000gpd.

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    3. It was kind of silly of them not to have some kind of….

      I don’t know, I’d call it a “Shut-Off Valve”.

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      • THAT was an oil spill. 3,000,000 barrels. And guess what? A few years later and nature takes care of itself.

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        • With a lot of help from us. Even if this is forgotten about in 10 years environmentally; the people being hurt, losing their ability to do their jobs, this may destroy them. It’s not just the environment; it’s BP. They’ve been stalling, lying and obfuscating at every turn. Their arrogance is unbelievable to me. At a time when so many are so pissed about the way bankers an corporations are behaving, BP behaves this way? What is wrong with them?
          Everything and anything can become political. I don’t blame environmentalists for using situations like this to make their point, even if I disagree w/ them.

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      • I don’t know if anyone is even going to see this comment, but here goes. The Ixtoc spill released 3,000,000 barrels over 10 months. The Deepwater spill is, by minimum estimates, at nearly 1,000,000 barrels after 1 month. At maximum estimates, it’s at 3,700,000 barrels. I’d say this is going to eclipse the Ixtoc spill pretty quickly.

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        • It’s like watching a not-so-slow disaster happen right in front of you. You think you’re acting quickly, doing all that can be done, but in reality, it’s already eclipsed what you thought could happen. Optimism is not the way to react to a disaster.

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    4. Australia keeps having this problem with Asian oil tankers, except they’ll go over the Great Barrier Reef and destroy coral, kill marine life and cost us millions in clean up and wildlife rescue. Oh, and the tanker companies don’t want to pay for it, even though it’s their captains that can’t navigate around one of the seven natural wonders of the world. The human race is so self-righteous and think they own the fucking world. The sea is not our habitat, gtfo and stop killing shit.

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      • Don’t blame BP. Our entire, oil addicted society is to blame. If we didn’t live or die based on the price of gas at the pump, this shit wouldn’t happen.

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        • BP does not provide oil as a public service, they are a “for profit” business supplying a commodity to a market.

          BP chose to farm said commodity, from this particular area, to make profits from that market.

          While our being addicted to that commodity creates said market, it does not justify the suppliers ineptitude in guarding against this type of accident; especially since the prevention technology is already available, and due to the insane profits they make, affordable.

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        • I think I’ll go ahead and blame them anyway. Certainly they should bear the brunt of the blame.

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    5. Top Pic: Ecco 3 – The Tides of Texaco. ๐Ÿ˜€

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    6. I wonder why they don put a hose up in that bitxh with something like a big stent on the end then open that bitch up. The pressure of the oil will keep the “pipe stent” open and against the pipe walls. I know I’m oversimplifying but simple is how a lot of ideas start. If it works, I should get free gas for life, nignog.

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    7. did anyone of you heard of the gulf stream? this shit is going to make it to the east coast and the middle pacific ocean…

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    8. Hope this shit is cleaned up before the fall migrations of waterfowls. I don’t want my duckys to get all fucked up down there.

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    9. It’s pretty easy to say it’s not a big deal when you don’t live there. Never mind all the oil rig workers who died horribly. Yes, in the grand scheme of things it is all irrelevant. Someday the sun will go nova and anything we humans have done will be meaningless. That arguement is just so effing stupid. People died, animals and fish are suffering and dying, people’s livelihoods have been destroyed, enormous amounts of money are being spent to contain this disaster. Who cares that worse things have happened?

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    10. I live in Florida and this is my concern: we get a hurricane while all that oil’s in the water? It will blow across the whole state, making cleanup ten times the difficulty, not to mention killing plants and animals, and poisoning the soil. And if it’s thick enough, what happens when oil meets downed power lines? poof! Michael Bay wet dream sequence. Holy shit, I just realized – could you imagine a hurricane made out of FIRE? It would be tragic, but the satellite photos would totally kick ASS!

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    11. Amazing! I’ve never heard of that before. Thanks for the lead!

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    12. All of these “intelligent” peoples numbers are wrong. I have family that works for bp and they reported correctly in the media for once when they said it was about 210,000 gallons a day. That is 3818.181818 barrels a day! As of May 27th, it was the second worst that the world has ever seen on land or sea. (other than in Kuwait)


      www.treehugger.com/deepwater-horizon-compared-sm.jpg

      This multiplied by the amount of days as of now(42) equals 160363 barrels so far!! That is 8,819,965 gallons so far. Anyone who says this is natural is an idiot. That is 4,409 times the daily amount that was aforementioned.

      I am also from a small town called Texas City, Texas. Look it up. It is where BP has had numerous refinery explosions and also environmental slips. Maybe, someday we should hold companies like this responsible instead of letting them mooch of the good ol boy system and pay off congress members. It sux either way…

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