Martin Luther King

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He didn’t lead a major civil rights struggle and get assassinated for you to walk around with your pants around your knees

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    34 Responses to Martin Luther King

    1. The thought behind this is nice but it’s a logical fallacy. A black American today, didn’t choose to be born black or to be raised in an environment where they would teach him that walking around with one’s pants around one’s knees is acceptable, so why would you expect him to dress a certain way just because another man who happened to be black, who was taught to wear suits, fought for his rights 60 years ago.

      By that logic you also would have to expect white Americans to feel ashamed for what their ancestors have done to the Native Americans.

      Complete nonsense.

      Mr. King fought for equality, not for blacks to feel like they have more responsibility just because their skin happens to be dark.
      And while we’re at it, the black history month is illogical as well.

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    2. say what? it’s just a bunch of funny stuff. like internet lulz n shit. damn, girl.

      Eloquent!

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    3. Hey it’s just my opinion. Since there are people who celebrate things like the black history month, I’m sure there are plenty who think this actually makes sense. I am interested in what other people have to say about the logic part, what other opportunities are there to bring this up.

      Lulz it provided, now gimme some different perspectives.

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    4. Sorry but this is the internet, all you will get is lulz.

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    5. Fair enough. I’ll go sit in the corner then and cite logical fallacies until my nanny comes to pick me up.

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    6. While that may be true,A black American today can still make a conscientious choice as to whether he will wear his pants a certain way, regardless of environment. It isn’t neccessarily the way people wear their clothes, it is how they wear their clothes and use this as a way to identify themselves. Way back when, the word “Nigger” was a racial slur and deeply offending, but now it has evolved into more of an attitude than anything else and to be a “Nigger” you have to personify it in the way you wear your pants and other clothes.

      I think the point that this post is trying to get acrros is that Dr. King didn’t lead a major civil rights struggle and get assassinated so that young black Americans can embrace this attitude of, “I’ma nigga, and represent this attitude in their looks, posture, and style of clothes.

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      • Nigger is just a word, black Americans today have about as much to do with Mr. King as any white American. Theoretically, it’s irrational for a black man to feel proud of Mr. King just because he’s black also.
        Of course, individuals can make their own choices, but it’s no coincidence that Mr. King wore suits since he grew up with a reverend as a father in a fairly conservative family. Just like those gangster kids would probably get beat up if they wore their pants too tight. Fashion and culture is something people are being taught, only education can cure it. Not some irrational connection to a man they have never met and aren’t related to.

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        • Go back to England, pick up a book and read all about the money we ain’t paid black people for workin yet. Whole corporations and even this nation was built on backs of slaves. The kid with the pants around his knees has a lot more to do with Dr King than me.

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          • Do you personally, know a black slave who didn’t get paid who is alive today? Nations all over the world have been built on the backs of slaves. Have you heard any Jews complain about the Egyptians enslaving them? No? It’s strange isn’t it.

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            • The difference here is we can still trace the money, and slavery in Egypt you refer to is 5000 years old. What, should Egypt give Israel the pyramids? Great argument. Give me an example of a modern economic powerhouse like America that rose to prominence with free labor. I take your point about moving on and being an individual and not being defined by the color of our skin.

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            • So, what do you propose. Because we can trace back a lot of crimes, not just American slavery related ones.
              All right then check this out, I myself am 1/4 black and 1/4 Hebrew. So how about we agree upon some kind of indemnity from you to me, because by all probability, my great grandfather whom I’ve never met and don’t know had to suffer because of your great grandfather whom you’ve never met and don’t know. Yeah I think that would be appropriate by your logic.

              I’m sorry, things like this support racism, it separates black people from the rest every time one looks at them in a different light just because of the past.

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            • i have never oppressed nor enslaved anyone, and if i have to pay some asshole $$$ because he feels entitled to my money just because my skin is white, WELL FUCK YOU, NIG­GER

              and our rise to prominence was not because black people were enslaved. there were many factors, including the richness of the land and raw materials, our enlightened form of government, & free, creative minds with the ability to achieve the things they set out to do, etc…

              also, look at the world of present day africans and the world of their american descendants. is there anyone who can argue that the life of the American Africans to day is a damn sight moar awesome than the life of an African African.

              their genetic line was improved, because they were bred to be bigger, faster, and stronger. many of the offspring are millionaires today because of this, and even the average black person today has freedom, money, and time to live his life as he chooses.

              i’m sorry that black people were enslaved and shit upon for 4 centuries. BUT GODDOMOT THE SLAVES AND THE MASSA’s ARE ALL DEAD AND GONE, AND MOTHERFUCKING AMERICA IS ONLY 200 YEARS OLD. can we get the fuck over the butthurt already?

              nig­gers and crackers need to move the fuck on

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            • I used to think you were smart. Just a smartass. Regardless of your ignorant opinion, the way you talk is out of line. If you said that shit in front of me, I’d give you a proper beating while everyone who heard your dumb mouth cheered me on.

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    7. If you look across America as a whole during the 30’s, you might in fact notice that the whole damn nation wore suits and it wasn’t uniquely due to the fact that his father was a reverend. Coincidence? I think yes. Is it irrational to make a connection to a man who fought for the freedoms and rights of black people? People who were considered a minority? Maybe Rosa Parks should have stayed seated at the back of the bus instead of refusing to be labeled as inferior, but because of her, public transportation became equal to all.

      It is not just because he is black, it was because he was black and stood up against the white majority and said, “hey, how am I any different? I have a heart that beats like yours, a pair of lungs that breathe the free air, why can my children not have the same opportunities as yours simply because of a skin color?”

      We sometimes like to call these, “irrational connections” role models, people who inspire us to stand up and fight for something we believe in.

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    8. Tetsuo,

      your argument is flawed. Mr. King didn’t fight for black Americans because they were black, but because they were humans.
      Therefore for a black man to feel any different towards Mr. King than any other American just because his skin is dark, directly contradicts what Mr. King stood for. It’s not that hard to understand, really.

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    9. To think of the amount of thought you people have put into this discussion is even more amusing than the joke itself.

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      • That is because I do so enjoy arguing with dieA and putting her in her place.

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        • Yeah but cut her some slack, she’s usually so right.
          Anyone under forty and living in a foreign land might get this one wrong…
          King was a black activist that tried to show his people that things could change only if they stood up as Men and Women with dignity and rights. The clothes and attitudes were a part of it. Even today, what little section of all people that dress down and talk crap never make it in life enough to help their own. No, we get idols that promote hoodlums and crime and rape in jest…this is no way to go about it.

          Bill Cosby would probably a more appropriate speaker to today’s generation of mainstream culture nonsense…

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    10. I believe it is your argument that is flawed. Martin Luther King didn’t fight for humans in general to have rights, he fought so that black people could have the rights. And yes he fought because they were black. Because they were black they couldn’t vote, because they were black they couldn’t sit at the front of the bus, because they were black they couldn’t eat in certain restaurants, because they were black they couldn’t drink from certain water fountains, because they were black they couldn’t go to certain schools, because they were black…

      Therefore, a black man SHOULD feel differently towards Mr. King because he is black because back then it meant you were different, an outcast, and it brought the black people a huge sigh of relief to be black and be accepted. He stood for equal rights for blacks to have what everyone else was allowed to have. I would certainly feel different to a member of my own race who stood up and said enough was enough, and I think many other people would agree with me on this point.

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    11. i agree. he did it so you could walk around with your pants around your ankles, tween all the white women. among other things, ofcourse.

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    12. Tetsuo,

      I didn’t say he fought for humans in general, I said he didn’t fight for them because they were black. Do you not see the difference? It’s primitive to advise a black man to behave well just because of what Mr. King did. Why don’t you tell them to be better humans because of what Kennedy, Edison, Eisenhower, Patton, Sagan or Chomsky have done.

      “I think many other people would agree with me on this point.”

      Argumentum ad populum is not gonna take you far sonny.

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    13. I believe this should settle any disputes that may have arisen

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    14. DieA’s correct in her logic. I come directly from Irish ancestry, and those of you who read the history books would not that Britain and Ireland have a tumultuous past. I am as far distanced from that as a young black male is distanced from the era of Dr. King. It does not directly affect who I am or who they are; it had some sort of influence over our families, but the only difference is I don’t insist on calling myself Irish-American and having a grudge against Britain. People feel they’re entitled to compensation for things that they didn’t even go through, and that’s just plain wrong. If I get into a car accident, I don’t demand they pay for more than what my car’s damage is worth, provided I am not hurt.

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      • Sorry but, when did you immigrate ?
        My wife was born in Dublin, and yes she has an ancestral, and current beef with the british Gov…and those Scottish types that Britain sent over to the North. (History lesson not provided here).
        .We learn from the past or fail and repeat the mistakes.
        King was a great man/speaker.
        What he did will stand as a positive influence in many a black person’s life. So will Bill Cosby, Mandella etc…
        The same way Chomsky, Kennedy and so on will influence their people.

        Just because you choose to isolate yourself from you heritage don’t think others do, in positive AND negative ways…

        The Orangeman haven’t forgotten your heritage, neither should you.

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    15. Dr. King carried himself with infinitely more grace, class & pride than the stereotypical urban youth. Granted, he was far more charismatic than most people, whatever their colour, but when you’re shuffling around with the waist of your pants somewhere around mid-thigh you lose credibility in my book – because you look silly. (Might as well be poppin’ your collar like some white douchebag from the suburbs.) Dr. King is a far more worthy role model than some hip-hop artist because of what he stood for, not because of the way he dressed.

      Just one white guy’s opinion.

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