Navy Railgun 2020

WNUS_Rail_Gun_Slide_pic.jpg (44 KB)

America, Fuck Yeah!
www.military.com/features/0,15240,160195,00.html

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    25 Responses to Navy Railgun 2020

    1. The guy who did this is kind of clueless with his numbers. “200+ nm in 6 minutes”? n= nano; m = meters. That means 0.0000002 meters in 6 minutes? That’s 1/4 inch a second. FAIL.

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    2. I’m guessing he/she meant Nautical Miles, n.m. according to the first hit on Google.

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    3. @comment #1: I sincerely hope u’r joking or else the FAIL is on u

      @comment #2: U had to google it?

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    4. Well, it’s sure not a measurement I use/come across every day, so it’s perfectly understandable to me coxswain.

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    5. Lorfmachine: Even if he wasn’t joking, nm stands for nanometers.

      Having a rail-gun is no excuse for fucking around with the International System.

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    6. I personally believe that the iraq are unable to jam GPS, because South africa does not have maps, such as.

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    7. My apologies, it was not my intention to step on anyones toes.
      Aaaanygays, I wiki’d it and here goes en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nautical_miles

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    8. Having a rail gun may not be an excuse for fucking around with the international system, but having the worlds most powerful navy IS, and when the US Navy uses NM, it means Nautical Miles. It’s all about the context, kiddies!

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    9. Suppose the barrel is about 10 m. If the exit velocity is 2500 m/s, then acceleration is 312,500 m/s^2 or about 32,000 gees. I don’t think guidance, navigation or controls are going to survive that kind of acceleration. A hot slug of tungsten, sure, but not a computer.

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    10. And 15 years ago the idea of something as complex as a stealth fighter plane was unimaginable, or active camoflauge. Imagine the technology available by 2020.

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    11. 1) The USN usually uses “nm” to mean nautical miles. This usage may actually predate the SI system.
      2) The issue with the acceleration probably isn’t “can we build a GPS unit that survives,” but “how expensive will it be to do?” I’ve always thrown the Bravo Sierra (that’s BS for you non-Navy types) whenever I see such a slide that implies such accelerations for off-the-shelf GPS equipment. But I must admit I have never seen definitive evidence of the cost.

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    12. “And 15 years ago the idea of something as complex as a stealth fighter plane was unimaginable”
      Are you insane?? The F-22’s first flight was 1990 and the F-117a was 1981. Way more than 15 years ago.
      Technology changes fast, but not that fast. In fact, I think you’ll be really hard pressed to find any truly innovative new technologies in the last 25 to 30 years.

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    13. US used TV Guided missiles in WWII, how long ago was that now?

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    14. Njch: your uneducated claims put a smile on my face. Its good to know that there are people blissfully unaware that the world will end December 21, 2012. Set your watches kiddies!

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    15. No innovative technologies in the last 25 years? I have no clue about computer stuff, but whatever long and complex series of inventions lead to catsthatlooklikehitler.com, something my parents could never have imagined when they were my age, must have taken such a great, long series of innovative leaps forward that surely this will be remembered as a technological Golden Age.

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    16. @reboot
      With a weapon like this, who needs guidance? 😛

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    17. @reboot:

      Wrong, wrong. wrong wrong wrong.
      The first prototype (not a functioning fighter simply a shell that had stealth capabilities) flight of a plane that got the contract for Lockheed was then. It wasn’t until 1997 that the F22 made a first successful flight, and then not until 2004 that the AF received the F22 as we know it today.

      And an F117 isn’t a stealth fighter. It is a bomber designated with F instead of B.

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    18. If you are a scientist
      nm = nanometers and you study how the universe works

      If you an engineer
      nm = nautical miles and you end up fucking you your Mars probe and send it crashing into the planet instead of orbiting it.

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    19. @njch412,
      YOU said a stealth fighter was “unimaginable” 15 years ago. I pointed out that its immediate predecessor was already in service and the prototype had already been build, which is far beyond the “imagination” stage of development.

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    20. And reboot, by the same token there are already railguns in existence, so the technology is there. The predecessor for this is already available. When I say the idea of a stealth fighter was unimaginable. The commn people had no idea of knowing that this cold exist while this is a much more possible invention than the F-22A.

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    21. @vygramul and wookie_x

      You guys are complete assholes and every woman related to you is a filthy whore.

      Which in my context means I love you guys.

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    22. Also, read the wiki article, the standard abreviation is nmi 🙂

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    23. njch412, stealth technology was developed and in use in the 50’s. And yes, “common” people did know, just not a whole lot of them. Just because they weren’t in airshows for locals to gawk at doesn’t mean they were totally unheardof.

      Besides, I’ve worked on the F117. So =P

      Reply

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